Harris Tweed – Weaving a Way of Life in the Outer Hebrides

Another lovely film from the Harris Tweed Authority including the very helpful and approachable Norman MacKenzie, who I met on my visit to the islands last year (and definitely does have an accent!).

Go Harris!

Tweedvixen's Blog

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Today is TWEED DAY

LET’S ADOPT IT IN THE UK!

Well – missed it! Yesterday was Tweed Day in America (but it might not be linked to our fantastic fabric.) However, think we should adopt a Tweed Day anyway – we need to celebrate what we are actually good at. Perhaps it could coincide with the London (or other) Tweed Run? What do you think? If you like the idea please spread the word.

Elegant Survival

Yes, put away your gold lamé–because today is TWEED DAY!

TWEED DAY TALE

Posted on April 2, 2013 at 10:25 AM

APRIL 3rd IS TWEED DAY

By M-J de Mesterton

Our friend Steve Worthington, eminent storyboard artist and sculptor, has written and illustrated a tale for Tweed Day, which is today, the Third of April, 2013.

Click upon the miniature picture to see Steve Worthington’s scintillating Tweed Day tale, an action-story that includes cartoon-images of me and my husband, and highlights the desirability of tweed cloth*….

*Tweed is cloth, not “fabric”.

Read More at Classic, Elegant Dressing

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Peter Roy from Knockando Woolmill on Working with Wool…

Wovember

At the start of this phase of WOVEMBER (Working with Wool) we mentioned Knockando Woolmill as a fantastic example of what can be achieved when one works both with wool and about wool. Working with Wool can of course be a purely practical decision based on its special material properties, but as we learnt from Kate Davies in her recent Q&A with WOVEMBER, WOOL is also intrinsically bound up with the social, political and cultural histories of the UK. If you work with wool anywhere in Britain it is possible to deliberately highlight the connection between what you’re doing and that long, rich heritage. Knockando Woolmill is a fine example of a place that is both producing woollen cloth, and maintaining its connections with the past.

Then… Duncan Stewart at work in the weaving shed (courtesy of Graham Stewart)

Then… Hugh Jones weaving on the Dobcross loom

Now… story and…

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Tweed and vintage clothing given new life – what more can a girl want? Long live this fashion trend and the endless possibilities it offers for re-invention.

Tweedvixen's Blog

Tweed has been since in the fashion world since the 1920s, mainly in the form of wealthy gentlemen’s suits. Since then, it has evolved into a trend that is still one of the hottest looks today! If you want to get involved with the vintage tweed trend then here are some tips on how to pull the look off.

Tweed Blazers 

Tweed blazers are one of the hottest ways to stay warm this winter!This quintessential British look works for both men and women, so whoever you are it should be easy to pull off. Men should go for a more fitted blazer look, which can then be paired with coloured trousers (mustard looks good with tweed) or even a pair of jeans. Women can wear a tweed blazer however they want, whether they opt for a fitted size or a boyfriend style bigger size. If you are going for…

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Definition of Tweed…

My own celebration of Tweed! A true Harris Tweed jacket – which tells the story of this fantastic traditional industry and its unique link to the landscape and lifestyle – given a new life with a contemporary twist.

Visit the other pages on my Blog for more exciting Tweedie items.

Tweedvixen's Blog

I was recently asked by the fabulous Audacious Huxley for my definition of tweed.  I thought that the answer would be easy and obvious, until I actually thought about it.  Just parroting the usual Oxford dictionary description; “a rough surfaced woolen cloth, typically of mixed fleck colours, originally produced in Scotland.”  or giving the standard origin story regarding tweed being a misreading of the word twill, whilst all true it seemed an empty answer.

I believe that tweed is a fabric steeped in British Heritage and so for me must be made in the United Kingdom or Ireland. I know that many great Mills around the world make a tweed fabric to different levels of quality, some rather good but to me they are not tweed.  When buying a tweed garment surely part of the appeal is the heritage and the story it tells.

Tweed must be at least 80% wool or it is not tweed!…

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